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Superstition ain’t the way

March 28, 2015
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Kappa Language School Blog

In the neapolitan Smorfia, number 17 stands for 'a disgrazia (the disgrace). In the neapolitan Smorfia, number 17 stands for ‘a disgrazia (the disgrace).

Stevie Wonder used to sing: “When you believe in things that you don’t understand, than you suffer” suggesting that superstition ain’t the way. What would Stevie have written if he had lived in Italy? He might not have believed that black cats bring bad luck or that breaking a mirror brings seven years of misfortune, but surely and unconsciously, he would have dreaded number 17.
Being Italians, we should quote Eduardo De Filippo instead, whose opinion was that “essere superstiziosi è da ignoranti, ma non esserlo porta male” (literaly: “Being superstitious is a sign of ignorance, but not being superstitious brings bad luck”).

For Italians and all the latin-greek countries, number 17 is the equivalent of number 13 for the anglo-saxons. This custom dates back to the Romans. On that matter it is said…

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